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LOCAL DIOCESAN NEWS

St. Thomas More Bible Study

The Book of James is the focus of a fall Bible study hosted by St. Thomas More Church, 11411 Goodwood Blvd. in Baton Rouge, Mondays at 6:30 PM and Tuesdays at 9:30 AM through November 13 and 14. For more information, please email: sarah@stmchurch.org

Diocesan News Page

Download Stewardship Today Free

For the convenience of our readers, a four-page, abridged set of monthly Stewardship Today articles is available as a downloadable PDF file.

Download the PDF Version

Planned Giving

How Your Will Keeps Giving, After You’re Gone


A will or living trust allows you to protect your loved ones long after your lifetime. These documents also grant you the power to provide vital resources to causes you care deeply about—resources that organizations and institutions like the Diocese of Baton Rouge need in order to thrive.

Read more . . .

And, for additional information concerning Diocese of Baton Rouge Planned Giving options, please visit the “Plan My Legacy” page through the Office of Stewardship website:http://officeofstewardship.planmylegacy.org

Within Another’s Shadow

Within Another’s Shadow

 

A century ago, the world’s tallest building was a newly-completed office tower located at the intersection of Broadway and Liberty in Lower Manhattan. The Singer Building, headquarters for the Singer Manufacturing Company, was designed by the Brooklyn-born and Paris-trained Ernest Flagg, an architect famed for his contributions to the Beaux-Arts movement. Interestingly enough, the Singer Building was the world’s tallest for only one year, until the Metropolitan Life Tower—completed in 1909—overshadowed its Manhattan neighbor. The majestic Singer itself outlived a developer’s sense of usefulness, and in 1968 the Singer Building was replaced by the U. S. Steel Building, a facility now known as One Liberty Plaza. At over forty stories and over six hundred feet, the Singer Building remains the tallest building ever legally demolished, removed to make way for something larger and more advantageous to those involved in the highly competitive New York real estate market.

Bigger and better. The first few decades of the Twentieth Century were defined, in part, by a motto symbolized by increasingly taller urban skyscrapers, a reality made more than ironic by the arrival of the Great Depression. Several notable examples of these structures remain, but each one has been surpassed by yet another, all bigger and taller, and—in the minds of property owners—certainly better. The roller coaster ride that current financial markets have taken reminds us that nothing is ever really very new. The wise Old Testament author of Ecclesiastes wrote, “I undertook great works; I built myself houses and planted vineyards; I made gardens and parks, and set out in them fruit trees of all sorts.” He also wrote, “When I turned to all the works that my hands had wrought, and to the toil at which I had taken such pains, behold all was vanity and a chase after wind, with nothing gained under the sun.”

One of the hallmarks of recent market upheaval has been the tendency to express concern over mismanaged loans, profits, losses and investments. More than a few pundits have used the ugly word greed to describe an unsavory tendency to want more even when an abundance would be more than enough. Big. Tall. Large. Plenty. But somehow never enough.

Do we seek fulfillment in the overwhelming shadows of our collections of possessions and properties? Hmmm. If the shadow created by a big and tall stack of goods could somehow dwarf our longing for true meaning and connection, then we’d simply add to what we already own, and that would satisfy us. But we know better. True, spiritual fulfillment rests in the awe-inspiring power and presence of the Lord Jesus and in our appropriate identification with him as his own. Not in a desire to add to what we have, but in a willingness to let go of it, that we might take firm hold of him.   

Stewardship Today is a monthly devotional newsletter designed to assist Catholics everywhere in developing a greater understanding of the role of stewardship in everyday life.
All we are, and all we possess, are gifts from God for our use and for the blessing of others. Through wise stewardship, we invest our time, our talents and our treasures to the glory of God.

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