devotional

LINKS WE RECOMMEND

Catholic Diocese of Baton Rouge
http://www.diobr.org

The US Conference of Catholic Bishops
http://usccb.org

The Vatican Website
http://www.vatican.va

Diocese of Baton Rouge Office of Stewardship
http://www.officeofstewardship.com

More Local, Regional and National Links...

CATHOLIC SAINTS ON STEWARDSHIP

From St. Frances Xavier Cabrini:

“We must pray without tiring, for the salvation of mankind does not depend on material success, but on Jesus alone.”

St. Vincent de Paul

StVicentDePaul

 

For more than a hundred and fifty years, The Society of St. Vincent de Paul of Baton Rouge has offered a clear mission of ministry and service to our hungry, homeless and needy neighbors. The Society is “a network of friends, inspired by Gospel values, growing in holiness and building a more just world through personal relationships with and service to people in need, offering person-to-person service to the needy and suffering.”

One of this year’s recipients of a Works of Mercy Trust grant, the Society of St. Vincent de Paul of Baton Rouge offers dozens of programs and services to those in need in our community: food services, shelter and housing, distribution centers and stores, a Uniforms for Kids program, prescription services, disaster relief and the Thirst for Justice legal clinic for underprivileged clients. Your contributions, along with gifts and grants, support their life-saving work. Give online by visiting www.svdpbr.org

THE STEWARD'S BOOKSHELF

Recommended Resources
for Reflection and Study

Through the Year with Pope Francis: Daily Reflections


Please visit “The Steward’s Bookshelf”
for additional recommendations.

Click Here

LOCAL DIOCESAN NEWS

Televised Mass

Catholic Life Television broadcasts the Tuesday Midday Mass, live from St. Joseph Cathedral at 12 Noon, and rebroadcasts the service at 6 PM and 10:30 PM. Visit www.catholiclifetv.org for a variety of daily Catholic programming.

Diocesan News Page

Works of Mercy Trust

Shield

In 1991, Bishop Stanley J. Ott initiated the Diocese of Baton Rouge’s Works of Mercy Trust to help fund area ministries through annual awards secured by the Works of Mercy endowment. Five worthy beneficiaries received grant awards this spring. The following organizations epitomize the kind of ministry and service for which Bishop Ott was well known, and each is a fine addition to the list of honored recipients: the Way to Work Program at HOPE Ministries of Baton Rouge; Metanoia Inc., to assist with creating a Sensory Therapy Room for human trafficking survivors; St. Vincent de Paul of Baton Rouge, to support their dentistry program; St. Agnes Catholic Church for cafeteria maintenance and renovations; and Manners of the Heart, to produce a Spanish translation of their book Raising Respectful Children in a Disrespectful World. With thanks for their devotion to the needs of others, congratulations to each worthy recipient.

STEWARDSHIP IN SCRIPTURE

“As a matter of equality, your surplus at the present time should supply their needs, so that their surplus may also supply your needs, that there may be equality.”

(2 Corinthians 8:13b-14; New American Bible, Revised Edition)

FROM THE ARCHIVES

Seeds of Instruction

From the Stewardship Today Archives, July 2011

Squirrels may be simple scavengers, but they are resourceful ones. Much of their diet is readily gathered from the base of trees, along sidewalk edges, and in collecting pockets as diverse as shingled roof valleys and blocked aluminum gutters. Encased in its protective shell, the meat of an acorn is a ready supply of food for the excitable squirrel just as it comes, resting right there on the soil. Yet, when consumed by that rich earth, its inherent potential yields more than food, for an oak provides sustenance, shade and shelter for many more animals and for people, too. A simple, innocuous seed is a truly miraculous thing....read more

Download Stewardship Today Free

For the convenience of our readers, a four-page, abridged set of monthly Stewardship Today articles is available as a downloadable PDF file.

Download the PDF Version

Planned Giving

Invest in Our Future

An endowed gift to the Catholic Diocese of Baton Rouge today provides a brighter picture for our future. When you make a donation to our endowment, you give a gift with both immediate and long-term benefits.

Read more . . .

And, for additional information concerning Diocese of Baton Rouge Planned Giving options, please visit the “Plan My Legacy” page through the Office of Stewardship website: http://officeofstewardship.planmylegacy.org

“Nothing is mine. I no longer have anything but Jesus. No place, no thing, no person, no thought, no feelings, no honors, no suffering can turn me away from Jesus. He is for me honor, delight, heart and soul.”      

                                                                                      St. Bernadette Soubirous

The Gospels spill over with stories that we enjoy sharing with our children. The birth of Christ is told over and over. So are the stories of miracles—five thousand fed with just a little bread and a few fish, adults and children healed, one man lowered by his friends through the ceiling of someone else’s house. Perhaps few stories are enjoyed by more children than the story told in Luke, chapter 19, about the diminutive tax collector named Zacchaeus. Even if we rely on the Gospel narrative alone, we know a fair amount about this man. He was a chief tax collector, and tax collectors were universally despised for the fees they demanded from their own countrymen. Zacchaeus was not well liked. He was small in stature but must have been in fairly good health. He was very wealthy, owned his own home, and was well known in the area around the town of Jericho.

 

The fact that Zacchaeus was a short man endears him to children, but it is key only in that it serves the story so well. “He was seeking to see who Jesus was; but he could not see him because of the crowd, for he was short in stature. So he ran ahead and climbed a sycamore tree in order to see Jesus, who was about to pass that way.” When Jesus reached that place, He looked up and, calling him by name, told the tax collector to get out of the tree. Why? “Come down quickly, for today I must stay at your house.”

 

Again, his height helps make the story, but more important is what we know of the man’s character, not his stature. As a tax collector, he had been party to fraud and extortion. Jesus chose to eat with him, not because he was wealthy, well-known or influential. Those are reasons for us to seek certain dinner companions, but not Jesus. The Lord sought him out because of what HE could do for him. He came to seek and to save the lost. Zacchaeus was short, it’s true. Were we casting a film, we would look for someone appropriately modest in height. We might have to look a while to find a person that fits the physical description, but we’d struggle much less merely to find a sinner. Any of us could audition. And Jesus came for us. As we think of the subjects of freedom and personal liberty, it is worthwhile to consider just how much we all have in common.

Stewardship Today is a monthly devotional newsletter designed to assist Catholics everywhere in developing a greater understanding of the role of stewardship in everyday life.
All we are, and all we possess, are gifts from God for our use and for the blessing of others. Through wise stewardship, we invest our time, our talents and our treasures to the glory of God.

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